SPIEF 2020 to discuss economic effects of epidemics



SPIEF 2020 to discuss economic effects of epidemics

SPIEF 2020 to discuss economic effects of epidemics

The St. Petersburg International Economic Forum will hold a panel discussion titled ‘New coronavirus and old challenges: how can we reduce economic effects of epidemics?’   

The discussion invites leaders of Russian and international health care organizations, scientific community, and global business. The session will be moderated by Anna Popova, Head of the Russian Federal Service for Surveillance on Consumer Rights Protection and Human Wellbeing and Chief State Sanitary Physician of the Russian Federation.

 “Massive epidemics that happen on a global scale do not just bring social effects. The new coronavirus is estimated to cause economic losses worth over a hundred million dollars. That is precisely why the St. Petersburg International Economic Forum becomes an important platform for discussing the medical and social aspects of fighting epidemics, as well as risk management and the role of governments and businesses in eliminating disease. Participants including representatives of the international community could use discussions to come up with a common approach all countries could introduce to override effects of epidemics and stabilize the global economic situation,” noted Anton Kobyakov, Adviser to the President of the Russian Federation, Executive Secretary  of the SPIEF Organizing Committee.      

The participants will discuss curtailing epidemics, their negative effect on the economy and the social sphere, the cost of risk management, the role the state, business, the scientific community, and the public play in battling infections. Also, they will talk about contemporary approaches to preventing and controlling dangerous epidemics.  

 “Biosecurity requires systematic approach. Uncontrolled biological research can affect a wide range of areas. Biotech has reached such a level that many projects could be seen as double-duty ones. These include ultra-profitable economic initiatives that have to do with genetically modified microorganisms, mass production and retail of genetically modified foods and agriculture commodities. In the modern world, the efficient international system that aims to prevent and contain biosecurity threats must meet very rigid criteria. It has to be universal and multifaceted at the same time, countries must trust it, and it has to have clear mandate and power. Prevention and control measures in the biohazard field must be perfected,” said Anna Popova, Head of the Russian Federal Service for Surveillance on Consumer Rights Protection and Human Wellbeing and Chief State Sanitary Physician of the Russian Federation.

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